Gossip & Celebrity

Robin Thicke Talks “Blurred Lines”: ‘You Won’t See Me Making Any Videos Like That Ever Again’

Robin Thicke is reflecting on his life during the success of "Blurred Lines," which was a lot more messed up behind-the-scenes than the public knows. 

Robin Thicke is reflecting on his life during the success of “Blurred Lines,” which was a lot more messed up behind-the-scenes than the public knows.

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While the pop single was a beloved number 1 hit before later becoming controversial, Thicke was lost amid such abundant success.

“I had lost perspective on my personal life and my music and what was appropriate … and why I was doing it,” he told The Post. “I’d lost the intention, you know what I mean? I needed to regain my perspective and my positive intention of what my music was for — and what my life was for.”

The singer went through a publicly difficult time when he separated from Paula Patton — who he had been dating since they were both teenagers — in February 2014. Four months later, he tried to win her back by releasing Paula, an entire album dedicated to her. While Patton still ended up filing for divorce that same year, Thicke says, “It turns out that that [album] was a necessary part of my learning curve.”

Their split happened in the midst of Thicke’s lawsuit with Marvin Gaye’s family over copyright infringement on “Blurred Lines.” In a deposition for the case, he admitted to abusing drugs and alcohol during promotion for the Blurred Lines album.

“Every day I woke up, I would take a Vicodin to start the day and then I would fill up a water bottle with vodka and drink it before and during my interviews,” he revealed at the time.

Of course, “Blurred Lines” also faced controversy surrounding the song’s actual content, which has been criticized for promoting rape culture and unwelcome advances with lyrics like, “I know you want it.” Plus, fans found the video, featuring a topless Emily Ratajkowski, to be degrading to women.

“We had no negative intentions when we made the record, when we made the video,” explained Thicke. “But then it did open up a conversation that needed to be had. And it doesn’t matter what your intentions were when you wrote the song … the people were being negatively affected by it. And I think now, obviously, culture, society has moved into a completely different place. You won’t see me making any videos like that ever again!”

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